Loving the 1980’s

In this article, I’m talking with Sarah Lewis, Author of “Your Eighties“, a book which celebrates the 1980’s and pop culture. I’ll let her get straight on with it:

Click to find the book on Amazon

Click to find the book on Amazon

What major trends in music shaped an era which we call the 80’s?

If there’s one word that sums up music during the Eighties, it’s “diversity”. Unlike any decade before or since, the era produced a spectrum of sound ranging from the Seventies overspill of Disco and Punk, through to Hip Hop and early Rave as we approached the Nineties. At any point during the Eighties, but especially around 84/85, you only had to look at a section of the charts to appreciate how varied the music scene was then. There would be Synth Pop and High Energy nestled alongside Rock and Metal; A Flock of Seagulls, Hazell Dean, Billy Idol and Iron Maiden all within a few chart places of each other.

Some music genres ran throughout the decade, their prominence varying due to the fashions of the time as much as the style of music they offered. For example, rock bands such as Def Leppard and Bon Jovi reached the height of their popularity in 86/87, when the mass appeal of big, permed hair was also at its highest. Although there is no denying that these music types are evocative of a particular period in time, the era-shaping trends of the Eighties were those music genres that went on to become an entire movement, the foundation of music production through to present day. I believe there are five main Eighties trends that can lay claim to having done this.

Two-Tone and Ska: The cornerstone of British music as we transitioned from the Seventies into the Eighties. Emerging from an anti-racist ideology, the message of tolerance and inclusion was often delivered both lyrically and visually, in the multi-racial mix of the bands’ line-ups.

New Romantics: Part of the UK’s broader New Wave scene, New Romantic groups such as Visage, Spandau Ballet and Duran Duran brought to the fore the integration of music, image and fashion, epitomised by Blitz Kids Steve Strange, Boy George and Rusty Egan.

Post-Punk: A term that encompassed a wonderfully eclectic mix of artists from Bow Wow Wow and Adam & The Ants to Siouxsie & The Banshees, The Cure and Echo & The Bunnymen, all of whom were unashamedly innovative and distinctive in their music and appearance.

Synth Pop: For many, the sound of the synthesizer is the sound of the Eighties. Whether it was Gary Numan, Ultravox, OMD, Howard Jones or The Pet Shop Boys, the inimitable appeal of Synth Pop grew prolifically throughout the decade.

Hip Hop: Colourful, vibrant and relaxed, the ‘uniform’ worn by performers and followers echoed the Hip Hop sound. Although mainly associated with American acts of the late Eighties, such as De La Soul and Run-DMC, it had filtered into the UK charts during the first half of the decade, thanks to artists such as Grandmaster Flash and Rock Steady Crew. It reflected a growing interest and demand in all things American, as the UK and U.S.A. grew their ‘special relationship’.

Never mind the politics, it was all about the hair ...

Never mind the politics, it was all about the hair … and fashion

What did Independent music do for us?

One of the reasons we had such rich, diverse music in the Eighties was due to the rise of Independent labels like Mute (Depeche Mode), Factory (Joy Division & New Order) and Rough Trade (The Smiths) records. Simply being signed to an independent record label was a statement of refusal to toe the corporate line. What it meant in reality was artists’ creativity and productivity grew, free from the constraints of the industry’s profit-managed decisions. Perhaps the most infamous example of this lack of financial regard was Factory records release of New Order’s “Blue Monday”. The artwork for the record’s original sleeve had been so expensive that each single sold actually made a loss! Never a better example of putting artistry above accounting.

Note from the editor : This clip of Bill Nelson interviewed by Mariella Frostrup is testimony to the “Do It Yourself” indie movement. Bill started Cocteau Records way back before the main independent labels and is one of my five favourite artists of all time.

The music itself, and access to it, was something of a phenomenon too. The publication of the first Indie Chart in January 1980 provided a more comprehensive picture of what people wanted to listen to, rather than the fragmented snapshots of popularity previously available. The effect of this was threefold. Firstly, it allowed radio stations and record shops to effectively meet the demand for Indie music, meaning fans had better access to the music they wanted. This, in turn, led to a crossover into the mainstream charts for a number of acts who attained fan-bases on the scale of artists signed to major labels, without losing their credibility as independent artists. The money this brought in to the independent labels provided the means to sign more and more artists, so that Indie music flourished, becoming a huge part of the diversity we have come to associate with the decade.

Tell me one of your favourite stories from “Your Eighties”

Well, without giving too much away, it has to be a recollection from James Sheppard, an 80’s fan who contacted me through my website (www.my-eighties.co.uk). I had asked for people to get in touch with their memories of growing up in the Eighties, and he replied with the opening lines “The 80s started as a decade of hope. On the 16th December 1979 I turned 9, and on the 18th we moved into a new house after a Harrier jump jet had crashed on our old one.” How could I not follow that up? Further investigation saw James recalling a tragic accident, which had made headline news. It was a privilege to be entrusted with his personal perspective, which I hope I have suitably conveyed in the book.

Similarly, the racism faced by The Special Beat when they toured the former East Germany, was another tale that captivated me when I interviewed Ranking Roger for the book. His story of the “so- called Nazi Skinheads” they encountered is compelling, as is his recollection of the more lighthearted moment when Saxa had David Bowie running errands for him, when The Beat played his support in 1983!

I can honestly say that I enjoyed every interview I undertook for ‘Your Eighties’, and the stories they produced were often hilarious. Dr. & The Medics’ Clive Jackson’s description of his wardrobe malfunction was just one of the factors that made interviewing him and the band one of the most memorable, as was Buster Bloodvessel’s onstage injury, which led to him referring to a certain part of his anatomy throughout the interview. In capturing those moments, I feel the book not only provides an insight into the Eighties, but into some of its most recognisable personalities too.

The author - Sarah Lewis

The author – Sarah Lewis

To what extent did 80’s music reflect the political and social culture of its time?

Enormously. This is a question I posed to my interviewees for ‘Your Eighties’, all of whom confirmed my own belief that one of the reasons 80’s music has endured is because of its reflection of the time in which it was written. Whether it was industrial unrest, consumerism or nuclear war, no subject was considered too big or difficult to tackle for songwriters of the Eighties. It wasn’t only those acts who were overtly political or outspoken, like The Style Council, U2 or Billy Bragg, who featured the decade’s issues in their songs. Both Ultravox’s “Dancing With Tears In My Eyes” and Nik Kershaw’s “I Won’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me” were about nuclear war. As a generation, those who grew up during the Eighties could hardly fail to have some political and social awareness, simply because of the music we were listening to. From Kershaw’s pop ditty to protest songs like “Between The Wars”, and even band names (UB40 and The Beautiful South), we were never far away from politics or social comment. It caused us to think, question, have a conscience and believe we could change the world for the better. We were the ideal audience and supporters when Band Aid and Live Aid came to being in November ’84 and July ’85 respectively. In addition to the pure enjoyment at witnessing the collaboration between some of the biggest stars at the time, there was a tangible feeling that we were part of history in the making. We were right.

Who do you consider to be the most important music acts of the 80’s and why?

I think the importance of those acts most associated with the five main 80’s trends we discussed earlier are a given, although some are more notable than others. For me, Terry Hall is outstanding, not only in his role with The Specials, but also with Fun Boy Three, The Colourfield and his various collaborations as a solo artist. His continual re-invention and refusal to stick with the same, safe formula ensure his music extends way beyond the boundaries of the Eighties, which are also the reasons why I consider Paul Weller and Madonna to be important contributors.

Editor’s note : Madonna shaped much of my life in the 80’s :-) to the point of applying a beauty spot when performing 

I find it difficult to answer this question from a purely musical point of view because, as we’ve already seen, 80’s music was influenced by and influenced, so many other factors. George Michael’s song writing is 80’s pop at its best, but we also shouldn’t forget that Wham! were the first Western band to tour communist China in 1985, a ground-breaking event. There is no denying the influence, quality and popularity of Culture Club’s music, due in no small part to distinctive vocal talents of Boy George. What is contentious is how successful the band would have been without George’s much- imitated look. Making their chart debut a year after the launch of MTV, Culture Club’s visual presence was fundamental to their success, but that does not necessarily lessen their importance within 80’s music. To some extent, this is also true of one of my favourite 80’s acts, Adam & The Ants. Despite having built up a notable, loyal following since forming in 1977, it was the emergence of the music video, and the band’s full embrace of it as a promotional platform, which gave Adam & The Ants a turbo boost to the top of the charts.

What is the legacy of the 1980’s on modern popular culture? What should be forgotten and what should be resurrected?

Experimentation and change are the keywords when talking about the legacy the Eighties left on modern popular culture. Whether it was music, fashion, comedy or an opinion, individuality was encouraged and positively embraced. That is something sadly missing today. Not only is there a uniformity and blandness in contemporary music and fashion, it’s almost as if the twenty- somethings and younger flatten out their personalities too when they take to the hair straighteners. Whether the cause is due to information overload, or maybe even a fear of being labelled politically incorrect, there is a palpable apathy amongst what should be the movers and shakers of a generation. The pursuit of recognition and reward for creativity, talent and (dare I say it?) making a difference in the world have been replaced by the fast-fix desire for instant fame, and a general dumbing down, in favour of mass accessibility. Whilst reality shows and the likes of the X-Factor continue to thrive, it’s unlikely to happen soon, but I do live in hope of an 80’s renaissance that sees people once again unafraid of being different and having an informed point of view.

I don’t believe there is anything that should be forgotten from the Eighties, if only to avoid making the same mistake twice. However, just because we should remember certain things doesn’t mean they should be resurrected. There are a number of offenders that fall into this category, including puffball skirts, mullets, Orville the duck, and The Toy Dolls’ version of Nellie The Elephant!

You can find Sarah Lewis’ books “Your Eighties” and “My Eighties” at Amazon:

Sarah's first book - My Eighties - click to find her books on Amazon

Sarah’s first book – My Eighties – click to find her books on Amazon

New Year Revolutions

During 2015 I was very lucky to sample some glimpses of what the future holds in healthcare, the environment and music. In this article I’m looking at some snapshots of ingenious innovations in these areas to encourage other entrepreneurs to get busy on their own new year revolutions.

Digital Health

Up till recently technology was not reliable and therefore difficult to use in situations where reliability is key such as healthcare. This has now changed and technology is on the cusp of being a health game changer. I witnessed some of the amazing innovations in healthcare, when I was invited to attend and present by Roberto Ascione, CEO of Healthware International at the Frontiers of Interaction conference in Milan just recently. Here’s three:

Tinnitracks helps manage tinnitus without the use of a pill but rather your music library, cancelling the frequencies responsible for the symptom. This enables us to use our smartphones as a therapeutic device, using our own preferred music to help reduce the hyperactivity of affected nerve cells and this ease the effects of tinnitus.

If a picture is worth a thousand words how is a video worth? Starting from this and from the knowledge that health videos are by far the most desired and effective way we learn about our own health Videum pioneers the potential of making validated health videos available to all in any language. For the first time, people can learn easily about health from high quality video enriched with additional content.

The diabetes management app OneDrop uses timelines, geolocalization, badges and social media to help people to stay within their target glucose level range. OneDrop was devised by a diabetes sufferer who felt things could be a lot better. The free app looks like a visual diary and allows people to simply record their glucose levels by saving them where and when they took the measure and maybe even link them to the photo of their meal. This helps people manage their diabetes better.

Recycling London

Imagine being able to cycle from South East London to West London on your bicycle without fear of being run over? Imagine being able to do that on the River Thames? This is the concept being pioneered by the Thames Deckway project, which aims to construct a dedicated cycle path along the Thames. I was privileged to attend a briefing on the project from a young entrepreneur who has arranged a crowdfunding project to gain momentum to advance the idea. In my opinion the project is viable, novel and would contribute massively to make London a greener, safer city for cyclists, motorists and the general public. If we are serious about the environment we must get busy on pedal power.

Networking and horizontal collaboration

Enterprises are increasingly finding that innovation springs from collaboration, often from networks that they don’t “own”, i.e. through partnership with external agents, customers, even competitors in some circumstances. In this context I am delighted to have been personally invited to the Open For Business global network, the brainchild of Ted Coiné. This global network of speakers, writers and influencers are very much open for business in 2016. Ted explains the concept:

Open For Business in 2016

Open For Business in 2016

I am very lucky to have a place in this network at Keynotes, adding to the global networks I share with Nadine Hack and Virgin.com. At last, the world is your oyster …

New Year Revolutions

  • In common with Professor Charles Handy, I predict that we are about to realise the power of networks, where small networks can join together to create massive changes in the world for good.
  • We are already seeing how small networks can exert big influence in healthcare and the environment. Entrepreneurs can, for the first time, exert major influence with good products and the ability to network them effectively.
  • Consequently we will have to embrace all the diversity that this opportunity presents, beginning to understand our relative unimportance in a complex and wired world.

Making better decisions that stick

Introducing the wonderful Dawna Jones from Vancouver.  Dawna is CEO of From Insight to Action, a change management consultancy which helps individuals, teams and organisations escape from tramline thinking that can become embedded into business cultures. She is author of Decision Making for Dummies and writes for The Huffington Post.

DM

Click on the picture to view the book on Amazon

Dawna kindly interviewed me for as part of her online interview series “The Evolutionary Provocateur podcast”, hosted by Management Issues. Take a listen.

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Click the image to listen to the interview

She says of change management:

“Over a decade ago, I was facilitating an organizational change initiative which made a lurch forward only to settle back as incremental change. Instantly, I realized that business decision makers and underlying beliefs in the culture weren’t adapting fast enough to match the accelerating ecological, climate and social change. Ten years of research into the science and spirit of human performance (and complex systems) gave me greater insight into how to work with the unknown to create greater creativity and resilience in companies and leaders at every level. Brain science tells us that decisions fall into repetitive ruts unless you actively introduce diverse opinions, reflect to learn from assumptions or take other steps to see from many levels and broaden perspective.  Advanced skills to deepen personal and organizational awareness along with simple principles allow greater functionality in complexity. Providing the learning environment to deepen skills personally and collectively is a personal passion of mine.

Dawna

Click on the image to move from Insight to Action

I asked Dawna for some insights into her work:

Making Better Decisions

Peter : What are the hallmarks of companies that make great decisions?

Dawna : They tap into both their intuitive intelligence and their collective intelligence. Transparency and trust are central to providing a growth oriented decision making environment where customers and employees contribute to providing the multiple feedback input required to stay alert to changing developments.

They take time out from being busy to reflect and gain perspective. Without that there is limited to no capacity for foresight – to see what’s coming ahead.

They flex their thinking to fit the situation rather than applying analytical thinking for every situation.

They are highly networked, consequently can keep pace with emerging change.

Peter : I love the idea of using their own intelligence and that of others. This triangulates a complex decision, leading to the best possible outcome rather than the lowest common denominator if done with skill. In a busy world, reflection becomes even more important if there is to be foresight.

Making decisions stick

Peter : As we know, it’s one thing making good decisions, quite another to take other people with you. How do you ensure that people follow their decisions? Why is an outsider essential?

Dawna : A decision not followed is a decision not inspired by a shared common goal. When a decision is forced from the top down, and it has a negative impact on those implementing it, it stands to reason that it won’t inspire the energy required for action. An outsider brings in an objective take on the underlying dynamics so the invisible factors, like cultural beliefs in conflict with the direction, can be identified and reviewed rather than dealing with the undertow created when you’re trying to do something different and it conflicts with what’s always been done before. Most often, this kind of conflict surfaces in behaviour and the temptation is to fix the behaviour. It’s a much deeper dynamic going on that someone not immersed in the environment can detect quickly using intuitive insight.

The importance of reflection and incubation

The importance of reflection and incubation – extract from Decision Making for Dummies – click on the picture to find the book on Amazon

Peter : The concept of undertow resonates strongly with me, reminding me of the lyrics to the song by Suzanne Vega, although clearly the song places a different meaning on the word undertow …. but do we really need an excuse to play a Suzanne Vega song!? :-) However, it made me think that the more leaders push, sometimes this produces an equal and opposite reaction from those being ‘pushed’. Leaders must learn to engage and develop collaboration if they want to ‘pull’ instead of ‘push’. There are only a few circumstances when push is of value such as turnarounds and crises. Even then, smart leaders understand that great decisions may come from those closest to the action. You remind me that the outsider sees things that others don’t see and much earlier, allowing an enterprise to correct its decision before it has happened.

Music and the mind

Peter : We talked a lot in the interview you kindly did about music and the mind. Share some of your thinking on the role which music can play in shaping our lives.

Dawna : To me, music is the song of the soul celebrating life in its many emotions. With respect to business, it can serve as a metaphor as you do so well in your work and it can also serve to bring calm to a stressed high pressure environment. Mark Romero’s music, for instance, has the effect of calming and bringing your body into physical coherence meaning you’re able to access your alpha (creativity) state and also gain harmony between the mind and the heart. Certain classical music is used by more enlightened education systems to help students remember their work without needing to exercise recall – That helps those of us have the ability to recall or memorise. None of this has to be set at high volume to work. Low volume works just fine. Music gives us the chance to enrich our creativity (same part of the brain) and stimulate expression.

Work with Dawna and myself on learning at the speed of sound

Work with Dawna and myself on learning at the speed of sound

Peter : I can certainly attest to the memory value of music, having used it over many years to help people excel across a range of circumstances from passing exams to locking in important thoughts into long term memory. I have never visited a country yet where people cannot more or less recite the words to Bohemian Rhapsody, now 40 years old. A pity they don’t always know so much about their company’s mission statements!! :-) Having just watched a Queen documentary on television last night it reminded me of attending Hyde Park to see them in 1976 – one truly amazing concert.

Contact Dawna via From Insight to Action if you are interested in making better business decisions. Dawna and I are available for joint projects into 2016 around the world, combining thoughtful Organisation Development with masterclass inputs that blend business ideas with music for maximum engagement and application.

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About the Blogger

Peter Cook leads Human Dynamics and The Academy of Rock. Check out our books on Amazon which make excellent seasonal gifts. We are currently booking launch events for Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise, a major new book for 2016 with Bloomsbury, featuring exclusive interviews with Sir Richard Branson and Sir James Dyson.

Books x 4

Punks, Virgins and Pop Art

I’m proud to present a unique event on Friday November 27th 3 pm at The Virgin Lounge in Eagle Place, London with Richard Strange, founder of proto-punk band The Doctors of Madness, who inspired The Sex Pistols, The Damned, Spandau Ballet, Richard Branson, The Jam, Joy Division et al.

Urban Blitz performing with The Doctors of Madness at Richard's celebration of William Burroughs at The Royal Festival Hall

Urban Blitz performing with The Doctors of Madness at Richard’s celebration of William Burroughs at The Royal Festival Hall

Richard will talk about leading the pop art / punk rock revolt and the wider notions of disruption in music and business. He will share some hilarious and insightful stories, including his time as a Virgin Records artist, how not to deal with Bryan Ferry and various other delights  Strange will also talk about a mammoth undertaking last year, where he put on an entire theatre production at the Royal Festival Hall to celebrate the life of William Burroughs, author of “Naked Lunch” and a primary figure in the Beat Generation who influenced David Bowie, The Beatles, R.E.M, Steely Dan and U2 to name but a few.

Ginsberg-Burroughs-Angel-wings

Ginsberg and Burroughs in the Theatre Production by Richard Strange

Take a look at the trailer video for the show:

Join us in the Lounge with Richard for an interview supplemented with great video footage, Q and A, meet and greet and possible mini acoustic performance.

Please contact the London Eagle Place Lounge on 0207 439 8802 to register your place.

Never Mind The Credit Card

Never Mind The Credit Card …

Party’s Over .. but I’m still Eight Miles High

I had the great pleasure of playing with a Rock Legend just recently, at London’s Borderline with Bernie Tormé and the band. Even more frightening to be in front of a crowd of fans who can be quite precious about their heroes, not always wanting any interference with their expectations from outsiders.  It seems I more than “got away” with the whole thing, having impressed blogger Darren Johnson with my ability to play with Class A rock stars:

Click on the picture to read Darren's Review

Click on the picture to read Darren’s Review

It seems that the world thinks that not only am I a good business consultant / author but also a rather fine guitar player who can hold their own with world class musicians. Getting an accolade like this is perhaps more important than scoring 11/10 on a happy sheet from an event or masterclass – of course, both things matter, but I think this review has set the week off rather well !! At the point of writing this I confess I am feeling rather smug – back to earth soon I hope ! Here’s some video of the rather drunken jam session:

Bernie Tormé’s tour continues through the month in Oxford, Newcastle, Liverpool and Brighton. Check the band out.

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We also did a superb event in The Virgin Lounge where Bernie did an interview, conducted a Q&A and gave a mini guitar masterclass.

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The Mile High Club at the Virgin Lounge – Picture by Christina Jansen http://www.cjansenphotography.com

The Band et moi and Peter Lawrence - Picture by Christina Jansen www.cjansenphotography.com

The Band et moi and Peter Lawrence – Picture by Christina Jansen http://www.cjansenphotography.com

A full interview with Bernie appears in my current book “The Music of Business” where we discuss the impact of climate on high performance, Jimi Hendrix, the gentle art of improvisation from a starting point of nothing and various other matters.

Click on the picture to check the book out

Click on the picture to check the book out on Amazon

Our next events in the Virgin Lounge are on Friday 27th November with the Godfather of Punk, Mr Richard Strange and Friday December 4th with Mark Christopher Lee, who has created an album of 100 x 30 second songs as a disruptive force in the music industry.

Halloween ROCKS

DATELINE: Halloween SATURDAY 31 OCT 2015, 3.00 – 3.45 pm

I’m launching the first in a series of inspirational events at The Virgin Money Lounge in London’s Haymarket. I will be hosting an interview, Q&A, meet and greet and guitar masterclass with Bernie Tormé, legendary guitarist with Ozzy Osbourne and Deep Purple’s Ian Gillan, a former Virgin Records’ artist. This is part of Bernie’s UK Tour to mark the launch of his new album “Blackheart”. Book yourself into the event at the Virgin Money Lounge, prior to Bernie’s gig at London’s Borderline on the same evening, where I’ll be joining him on stage for a few numbers. Come to the party !!

ONLY 15 Spaces left – book your place at the lounge via e-mail peter@humdyn.co.uk

Bernie’s tour is itself unusual in so far that it has been entirely funded by his fans all over the world using “crowdfunding”. Fans paid in advance for albums, t-shirts, guitar lessons, jam sessions with the band, studio experience days and even formed a “virtual gothic choir”, singing into their phones and having their voices transposed onto some of the album tracks in the studio.

What did Bernie learn from working with The Osbournes?

As it is Halloween, no doubt Bernie will be performing various pagan rituals to celebrate saints and sinners in the deathly hallows of rock. Only joking !! Do expect to hear some sonically unique guitar playing informed by Jimi Hendrix amongst a cast of giants, plus Bernie’s unique fusion of the blues, psychedelia and traditional Irish folk music.

Innovators in business and music – Jobs, Hendrix, Branson and Clapton – artwork by the very talented Simon Heath @SimonHeath1 

We will also be discussing lessons from life on the road with the Prince of Darkness himself, Mr Ozzy Osbourne and Deep Purple’s Ian Gillan, a former Virgin Records’ artist. There is much to learn in business and leadership from the School of Hard Knocks and Bernie’s insights are priceless.

This is the first of a series of events for Virgin. We have follow up events booked with Jess and the Bandits, currently touring the UK and the nation’s TV screens and others with Aaron Keylock, Joanne Shaw Taylor, Patti Russo, Meatloaf’s singing partner and, who knows …. Come Lounge With Me on Halloween. It’s not about the money … it’s only rock’n’roll but you will like it – I presently learning “No Easy Way” from “Glory Road” in preparation for a possible guitar duelling session …

Punk Rock Money – Banking with Attitude

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Some of Bernie Tormé’s insights into the creative process and an interview with Sir Richard Branson feature in our forthcoming book for Bloomsbury, Leading Creativity, Innovation and Enterprise. Order your copy now by clicking the image:

Agilty and Perception

In our occasional series of posts on the practical aspects of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), here’s a short post on one of NLP’s values, summed up by the phrase:

The meaning of communication is the response you get

This simple phrase is one of the hardest but most useful principles to get on board. Instead of thinking it’s someone else’s fault if they don’t ‘get you’, this NLP principle places the onus on you to vary your communication style to be more influential. the buck rests with you, and if at first you don’t succeed, try something different. Many times we misunderstand each other, as if we are speaking foreign languages:

I say Tomato, you say Tom Ate O, let’s call the whole thing off

In practice, you can use this idea in the following ways:

Try explaining yourself from the other person’s point of view

Explain yourself in the language they would prefer rather than your own preferences. Live inside their world, not yours

Ask them to explain what they don’t understand or accept, then move on from there

We live inside our own skins for much of thIn some cases, no matter hard we try, some people are “on the Central Line” and others “on the Circle” metaphorically speaking … of course there are points at which these tube lines meet … :-) Check the 1948 tube map out to think about how you can meet people in a conversation where they are rather than where you are:

Skilled negotiators and influencers understand and use these skills naturally but they can also be learned and refined. Check out our offerings in this area at Human Dynamics or give us a call to set up some NLP master coaching.

Of course some people are just really “hard to read” as illustrated by this cat cartoon from my friend’s cousin, the great Steve Bell – such people make great poker players amongst other life and business skills. More on this in another article to demystify and cut the crap (but not the cats) out of NLP.

We finish with Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers on the vexed question of communication excellence:

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Human Dynamics offers better business and organisation development, training and coaching. Our sister company The Academy of Rock specialises in cross-disciplinary learning on business and music, delivered through conference keynotes and longer masterclasses.

Do order your copy of the NEW edition of “The Music of Business” – Parallel lessons on Business and Music. Acclaimed by Professor Adrian Furnham and Harvey Goldsmith CBE.