Jacob Rees Moog … Pants to Brexit and other Brexit Party Hits

I’ve been asked to assemble an album of “Brexit Party Hits” … although I’ve yet to be invited to a Brexit party by our Government … 🙂  The working title of the album is BREXIT FREE and the idea is to professionally record an album’s worth of original songs about “Life without Brexit” (pleasure) and Brexit realities (pain). You can read about some of our activity to free us from self-harming Brexit in The New European newspaper this week.

I’m asking people to back the album production in advance via our “STOP BREXIT” Go Fund Me site. This will enable us to book studios, secure professional musicians, hire professional marketing support and so on.  There is an immense amount of organisation to do and costs involved to undertake this venture. I have been offered the support of Jon Morter, the man who knocked Simon Cowell off the Number One slot with his Rage Against The Brexit Machine Christmas hit. We are calling the collective of the bands that will record the album “Rage Against The Brexit Machine”. We will release the album with Nub Records, an indie label that won a place in the Guinness Book of Records for their 100 x 30 albums. I recorded 3 songs for these including “Trumptown” and “Beware the IDS of March“.

FAQ’s

What will be on the album?

The actual album is being written now and we will crowdsource the words on our BBC (Brexit Boat Cruise) on the River Thames on 19 August. However, here are some titles to whet your appetite:

  • Pants to Brexit – feat Pan(t)’s People
  • Jacob Rees Moog – a Tory dancefloor groove in the style of “19”
  • Better Together – An Ode To Joy
  • What EU mean to me – A Love Song
  • Fiscal Cliff – On Economics and Cliff Edges
  • Bojo Funk – A revision of the Bruno Mars hit Uptown Funk
  • We are the Brexit Girls – A revision of The Cheeky Song
  • Brexit Free
  • No Jeremy Corbyn

Who will be on the album?

This is a collaborative effort, so please contact me if you wish to contribute.  We will certainly be including our Boris Johnson impersonator Faux Bojo but there is room for other singers and players.

We campaign tirelessly for a Brexit Free World – click to read Rebecca Buck’s superb piece on our work

Packing them in at Downing Street – Photo by Bruce Tanner – http://www.brucetanner.com

Will there be a single?

Yes, several. “Pants to Brexit”, “Jacob Rees Moog”, “I wanna be Brexit Free” and “No Jeremy Corbyn” are the current contenders.

No to Brexit JC

What happens if we don’t raise all the money?

If the album project does not fully fund we will produce the singles. If not the money will be used to fight Brexit via the live events we have planned at the Labour / Conservative / Lib Dem Party Conferences and other events around the country.

Check the Go Fund Me page out now – Let’s Break Brexit Before Brexit Breaks Britain …

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Peter Cook is a business consultant, author of 7.5 books on business, keynote speaker and musician. He blends his three passions of science, business and music in his work at The Academy of Rock and Human Dynamics which he has run for 23 years. In his early career he brought new pharmaceutical products to market safely including Human Insulin and the world’s first HIV / AIDS treatment.

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Leadership Lessons from Two Virgins

I was approached by David Tait OBE recently to form a speaking partnership. David was with Virgin Atlantic from the very beginning and is acknowledged by Sir Richard Branson as having played a pivotal role in the development of Virgin, marking its progress from an underground office to a global luxury brand.David wrote British Atlantic Airways first business plan, a company that would eventually become Virgin Atlantic. In 1984, Tait became the fledgling airline’s first US employee, reporting directly to Sir Richard Branson. He built and led all the airline’s North American operations including sales, marketing, operations, customer service, finance, IT and HR. He was awarded an OBE in 2001 by Queen Elizabeth II for “services to British aviation in the United States”. Since that time he has worked as a consultant to the airline and travel industry and is a founding partner in the online luxury hotel booking site “Discover Luxury”. David has a veritable treasure trove of stories that offer insights into the ingenious and disruptive strategies of a serial entrepreneur and the Virgin brand. Here are just a few of the stories we share in our work together.

I want to break free … frustration and innovation


In the same way that Sir James Dyson’s breakthrough Dual Cyclone vacuum cleaner was inspired by his frustration with his existing vacuum cleaner, Branson’s decision to start Virgin Atlantic was inspired by a sense of frustration with existing customer service:

“As the head of Virgin Records, Richard Branson was a frequent flier between London and New York. Frustrated by consistently high fares and bad service he was convinced there had to be a better way and so, never one to be hindered by conventional wisdom, decided he would look at starting his own transatlantic airline. He’d learned from his success in the music business that what doesn’t work in theory can sometimes work in practice. But this was different – in a business ruled by Goliaths, starting another airline was a major leap of faith!

But just ‘another airline’ wasn’t what Branson had in mind. With the help of a few former Laker executives and some entertainment industry flair, Virgin crafted a radically different model. Branded Virgin Atlantic Airways – by conservative airline standards a risqué move – the product it offered would be equally disruptive.”

revivals

An obsession with Customer Service – Virgin Upper Class

Being frustrated is insufficient to innovate.  You must go on and do something about it. Some 5127 prototypes later James Dyson produced his first commercially viable Dual Cyclone cleaner. Branson also went past frustration and disrupted the market in a monopoly industry. Find out more about Dyson and Branson in our exclusive interviews with both at “Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise

Screw it, Let’s do it


David recalls the “Screw it, Let’s do it” days of Virgin Atlantic’s maiden flights to New York. One of Richard Branson’s secrets is that he is a master of delegation and that sometimes means he does not always “do the detail”. It turned out that Richard had managed to forget his passport for the first Virgin Atlantic flight to the USA, which technically made him an illegal immigrant! David had to skilfully navigate his way out of the problem …

Brand-son


David also shares insights on how to change the customer experience via the early days of Virgin Atlantic with a fellow alumni of my secondary school, Sir David Frost:

“Those on the inbound trip were party to a flight that could well have made the Guinness World Records book for the most champagne consumed on a single Atlantic crossing.

A smiling David Frost, who was almost a weekly commuter across the Atlantic at the time, told me that it was the first time he’d ever made the entire seven-hour trip standing up with a drink in his hand”.

richard-branson

Sir David Frost R.I.P.

As well as some great storytelling, together David and I offer deep insights and takeaway concepts presented in ways that last forever. My experience of teaching MBA’s over 20 years has shown that we are missing out on the heart and soul of leadership by just teaching dry concepts. The mnemonic MBA should really stand for Much Bigger Amplifiers rather than More Blooming Analysis! We cover subjects such as

  • Disruptive thinking about your business strategy and practices
  • Converting ideas into sustainable innovations
  • Building and rethinking your brand to face a VUCA world (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous)
  • The “anatomy” of Sir Richard Branson : Why he leads the way he does
  • How does Virgin organise its affairs? – Culturally, structurally and in terms of day to day people management
  • Customer Centricity without Customer OCD
  • Leadership for good : Balancing Passion, Purpose and Profit

We finish with the hilarious story of Richard’s entrée into the world of Cola, which resulted in failure:

Cola Wars


“When trying to promote anything in the US one really has to “Go big or go home” – well, we went big! … I drove a vintage Sherman tank down Broadway … heroically smashing through a giant wall of Coke and Pepsi cans.”

Sir Richard Branson

On this occasion Richard’s underlying modus operandi of “playing David to Goliath” did not succeed. Coca Cola engaged their massive distribution machine to ensure there was no room on the shelves for Virgin’s product, Coke was discounted massively and Virgin retired injured. The key point here is the idea that success recipes work for a set of reasons and therefore transplanting a recipe (the David and Goliath approach in this case) does not always work in a new set of circumstances.

Contact me via peter@humdyn.co.uk to book David and myself for that very special event.

With Sir Richard Branson at The Virgin Money Lounge

With Sir Richard Branson at The Virgin Money Lounge

Amplifying your brand

What do Pete Townshend, Jeff Beck, Slash, Alex Lifeson, Kirk Hammett and Buddy Guy have in common? They all played through a guitar amplifier brand that the legendary amp designer Steve Grindrod has worked for …

I came across Steve Grindrod recently via a couple of contacts in a most unlikely series of network connections, from Cult Punk Rocker John Otway to the owner of Carlsbro Amplifiers, a chap in Canada who I’d connected with on Linkedin via another Brit abroad who went to school with Elton John and worked on Live Aid !! 🙂 Proof positive to the naysayers that networking works … but, like everything, you have to work at it …

Steve is the designer of Grindrod Amplifiers with 27 years working as Chief Designer at Marshall Amps, where he created iconic amps including the JCM800, Silver Jubilee, JCM900 and JCM2000 and 8 years as Chief Designer at Vox, where he created the AC30, Custom Classic, and Heritage AC15. A tech enthusiast and tone obsessive, Steve created Grindrod to take the guitarist’s dream sound to new heights.

Buy your share of Grindrod Amplifiers - Click on the picture

Buy your share of Grindrod Amplifiers – Click on the picture

Steve is inviting music enthusiasts to share in the ownership of his namesake brand through popular UK equity crowdfunding portal Seedrs. Grindrod is making 50-percent of the equity in his company available through the Seedrs offering. He says:

“For over 40 years I’ve obsessed on one thing: making guitarists sound better. The way I’ve achieved this is by listening deeply to their concerns and by becoming one with their wants and needs,” said Steve Grindrod. “Since we’re one emotionally and SGA is still a young company, I felt it would be meaningful to invite guitarists to share in the growth of my brand with me. Has a guitarist ever been able to say, ‘I own a piece of the amp brand I play?’ Now they can.”

What do Grindrod amps sound like?  Well, have a listen to this demo by Steppenwolf’s guitarist:

This is your once in a lifetime chance to own a piece of music history. Shake your money maker by checking out Grindrod’s Crowdfunding Site out now.

Hall of fame

Hall of fame

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Peter Cook leads Human Dynamics and The Academy of Rock. Check his latest book “Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise” out at Bloomsbury.

Leading-Innovation-Twitter

Loving the 1980’s

In this article, I’m talking with Sarah Lewis, Author of “Your Eighties“, a book which celebrates the 1980’s and pop culture. I’ll let her get straight on with it:

Click to find the book on Amazon

Click to find the book on Amazon

What major trends in music shaped an era which we call the 80’s?

If there’s one word that sums up music during the Eighties, it’s “diversity”. Unlike any decade before or since, the era produced a spectrum of sound ranging from the Seventies overspill of Disco and Punk, through to Hip Hop and early Rave as we approached the Nineties. At any point during the Eighties, but especially around 84/85, you only had to look at a section of the charts to appreciate how varied the music scene was then. There would be Synth Pop and High Energy nestled alongside Rock and Metal; A Flock of Seagulls, Hazell Dean, Billy Idol and Iron Maiden all within a few chart places of each other.

Some music genres ran throughout the decade, their prominence varying due to the fashions of the time as much as the style of music they offered. For example, rock bands such as Def Leppard and Bon Jovi reached the height of their popularity in 86/87, when the mass appeal of big, permed hair was also at its highest. Although there is no denying that these music types are evocative of a particular period in time, the era-shaping trends of the Eighties were those music genres that went on to become an entire movement, the foundation of music production through to present day. I believe there are five main Eighties trends that can lay claim to having done this.

Two-Tone and Ska: The cornerstone of British music as we transitioned from the Seventies into the Eighties. Emerging from an anti-racist ideology, the message of tolerance and inclusion was often delivered both lyrically and visually, in the multi-racial mix of the bands’ line-ups.

New Romantics: Part of the UK’s broader New Wave scene, New Romantic groups such as Visage, Spandau Ballet and Duran Duran brought to the fore the integration of music, image and fashion, epitomised by Blitz Kids Steve Strange, Boy George and Rusty Egan.

Post-Punk: A term that encompassed a wonderfully eclectic mix of artists from Bow Wow Wow and Adam & The Ants to Siouxsie & The Banshees, The Cure and Echo & The Bunnymen, all of whom were unashamedly innovative and distinctive in their music and appearance.

Synth Pop: For many, the sound of the synthesizer is the sound of the Eighties. Whether it was Gary Numan, Ultravox, OMD, Howard Jones or The Pet Shop Boys, the inimitable appeal of Synth Pop grew prolifically throughout the decade.

Hip Hop: Colourful, vibrant and relaxed, the ‘uniform’ worn by performers and followers echoed the Hip Hop sound. Although mainly associated with American acts of the late Eighties, such as De La Soul and Run-DMC, it had filtered into the UK charts during the first half of the decade, thanks to artists such as Grandmaster Flash and Rock Steady Crew. It reflected a growing interest and demand in all things American, as the UK and U.S.A. grew their ‘special relationship’.

Never mind the politics, it was all about the hair ...

Never mind the politics, it was all about the hair … and fashion

What did Independent music do for us?

One of the reasons we had such rich, diverse music in the Eighties was due to the rise of Independent labels like Mute (Depeche Mode), Factory (Joy Division & New Order) and Rough Trade (The Smiths) records. Simply being signed to an independent record label was a statement of refusal to toe the corporate line. What it meant in reality was artists’ creativity and productivity grew, free from the constraints of the industry’s profit-managed decisions. Perhaps the most infamous example of this lack of financial regard was Factory records release of New Order’s “Blue Monday”. The artwork for the record’s original sleeve had been so expensive that each single sold actually made a loss! Never a better example of putting artistry above accounting.

Note from the editor : This clip of Bill Nelson interviewed by Mariella Frostrup is testimony to the “Do It Yourself” indie movement. Bill started Cocteau Records way back before the main independent labels and is one of my five favourite artists of all time.

The music itself, and access to it, was something of a phenomenon too. The publication of the first Indie Chart in January 1980 provided a more comprehensive picture of what people wanted to listen to, rather than the fragmented snapshots of popularity previously available. The effect of this was threefold. Firstly, it allowed radio stations and record shops to effectively meet the demand for Indie music, meaning fans had better access to the music they wanted. This, in turn, led to a crossover into the mainstream charts for a number of acts who attained fan-bases on the scale of artists signed to major labels, without losing their credibility as independent artists. The money this brought in to the independent labels provided the means to sign more and more artists, so that Indie music flourished, becoming a huge part of the diversity we have come to associate with the decade.

Tell me one of your favourite stories from “Your Eighties”

Well, without giving too much away, it has to be a recollection from James Sheppard, an 80’s fan who contacted me through my website (www.my-eighties.co.uk). I had asked for people to get in touch with their memories of growing up in the Eighties, and he replied with the opening lines “The 80s started as a decade of hope. On the 16th December 1979 I turned 9, and on the 18th we moved into a new house after a Harrier jump jet had crashed on our old one.” How could I not follow that up? Further investigation saw James recalling a tragic accident, which had made headline news. It was a privilege to be entrusted with his personal perspective, which I hope I have suitably conveyed in the book.

Similarly, the racism faced by The Special Beat when they toured the former East Germany, was another tale that captivated me when I interviewed Ranking Roger for the book. His story of the “so- called Nazi Skinheads” they encountered is compelling, as is his recollection of the more lighthearted moment when Saxa had David Bowie running errands for him, when The Beat played his support in 1983!

I can honestly say that I enjoyed every interview I undertook for ‘Your Eighties’, and the stories they produced were often hilarious. Dr. & The Medics’ Clive Jackson’s description of his wardrobe malfunction was just one of the factors that made interviewing him and the band one of the most memorable, as was Buster Bloodvessel’s onstage injury, which led to him referring to a certain part of his anatomy throughout the interview. In capturing those moments, I feel the book not only provides an insight into the Eighties, but into some of its most recognisable personalities too.

The author - Sarah Lewis

The author – Sarah Lewis

To what extent did 80’s music reflect the political and social culture of its time?

Enormously. This is a question I posed to my interviewees for ‘Your Eighties’, all of whom confirmed my own belief that one of the reasons 80’s music has endured is because of its reflection of the time in which it was written. Whether it was industrial unrest, consumerism or nuclear war, no subject was considered too big or difficult to tackle for songwriters of the Eighties. It wasn’t only those acts who were overtly political or outspoken, like The Style Council, U2 or Billy Bragg, who featured the decade’s issues in their songs. Both Ultravox’s “Dancing With Tears In My Eyes” and Nik Kershaw’s “I Won’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me” were about nuclear war. As a generation, those who grew up during the Eighties could hardly fail to have some political and social awareness, simply because of the music we were listening to. From Kershaw’s pop ditty to protest songs like “Between The Wars”, and even band names (UB40 and The Beautiful South), we were never far away from politics or social comment. It caused us to think, question, have a conscience and believe we could change the world for the better. We were the ideal audience and supporters when Band Aid and Live Aid came to being in November ’84 and July ’85 respectively. In addition to the pure enjoyment at witnessing the collaboration between some of the biggest stars at the time, there was a tangible feeling that we were part of history in the making. We were right.

Who do you consider to be the most important music acts of the 80’s and why?

I think the importance of those acts most associated with the five main 80’s trends we discussed earlier are a given, although some are more notable than others. For me, Terry Hall is outstanding, not only in his role with The Specials, but also with Fun Boy Three, The Colourfield and his various collaborations as a solo artist. His continual re-invention and refusal to stick with the same, safe formula ensure his music extends way beyond the boundaries of the Eighties, which are also the reasons why I consider Paul Weller and Madonna to be important contributors.

Editor’s note : Madonna shaped much of my life in the 80’s 🙂 to the point of applying a beauty spot when performing 

I find it difficult to answer this question from a purely musical point of view because, as we’ve already seen, 80’s music was influenced by and influenced, so many other factors. George Michael’s song writing is 80’s pop at its best, but we also shouldn’t forget that Wham! were the first Western band to tour communist China in 1985, a ground-breaking event. There is no denying the influence, quality and popularity of Culture Club’s music, due in no small part to distinctive vocal talents of Boy George. What is contentious is how successful the band would have been without George’s much- imitated look. Making their chart debut a year after the launch of MTV, Culture Club’s visual presence was fundamental to their success, but that does not necessarily lessen their importance within 80’s music. To some extent, this is also true of one of my favourite 80’s acts, Adam & The Ants. Despite having built up a notable, loyal following since forming in 1977, it was the emergence of the music video, and the band’s full embrace of it as a promotional platform, which gave Adam & The Ants a turbo boost to the top of the charts.

What is the legacy of the 1980’s on modern popular culture? What should be forgotten and what should be resurrected?

Experimentation and change are the keywords when talking about the legacy the Eighties left on modern popular culture. Whether it was music, fashion, comedy or an opinion, individuality was encouraged and positively embraced. That is something sadly missing today. Not only is there a uniformity and blandness in contemporary music and fashion, it’s almost as if the twenty- somethings and younger flatten out their personalities too when they take to the hair straighteners. Whether the cause is due to information overload, or maybe even a fear of being labelled politically incorrect, there is a palpable apathy amongst what should be the movers and shakers of a generation. The pursuit of recognition and reward for creativity, talent and (dare I say it?) making a difference in the world have been replaced by the fast-fix desire for instant fame, and a general dumbing down, in favour of mass accessibility. Whilst reality shows and the likes of the X-Factor continue to thrive, it’s unlikely to happen soon, but I do live in hope of an 80’s renaissance that sees people once again unafraid of being different and having an informed point of view.

I don’t believe there is anything that should be forgotten from the Eighties, if only to avoid making the same mistake twice. However, just because we should remember certain things doesn’t mean they should be resurrected. There are a number of offenders that fall into this category, including puffball skirts, mullets, Orville the duck, and The Toy Dolls’ version of Nellie The Elephant!

You can find Sarah Lewis’ books “Your Eighties” and “My Eighties” at Amazon:

Sarah's first book - My Eighties - click to find her books on Amazon

Sarah’s first book – My Eighties – click to find her books on Amazon

New Year Revolutions

During 2015 I was very lucky to sample some glimpses of what the future holds in healthcare, the environment and music. In this article I’m looking at some snapshots of ingenious innovations in these areas to encourage other entrepreneurs to get busy on their own new year revolutions.

Digital Health

Up till recently technology was not reliable and therefore difficult to use in situations where reliability is key such as healthcare. This has now changed and technology is on the cusp of being a health game changer. I witnessed some of the amazing innovations in healthcare, when I was invited to attend and present by Roberto Ascione, CEO of Healthware International at the Frontiers of Interaction conference in Milan just recently. Here’s three:

Tinnitracks helps manage tinnitus without the use of a pill but rather your music library, cancelling the frequencies responsible for the symptom. This enables us to use our smartphones as a therapeutic device, using our own preferred music to help reduce the hyperactivity of affected nerve cells and this ease the effects of tinnitus.

If a picture is worth a thousand words how is a video worth? Starting from this and from the knowledge that health videos are by far the most desired and effective way we learn about our own health Videum pioneers the potential of making validated health videos available to all in any language. For the first time, people can learn easily about health from high quality video enriched with additional content.

The diabetes management app OneDrop uses timelines, geolocalization, badges and social media to help people to stay within their target glucose level range. OneDrop was devised by a diabetes sufferer who felt things could be a lot better. The free app looks like a visual diary and allows people to simply record their glucose levels by saving them where and when they took the measure and maybe even link them to the photo of their meal. This helps people manage their diabetes better.

Recycling London

Imagine being able to cycle from South East London to West London on your bicycle without fear of being run over? Imagine being able to do that on the River Thames? This is the concept being pioneered by the Thames Deckway project, which aims to construct a dedicated cycle path along the Thames. I was privileged to attend a briefing on the project from a young entrepreneur who has arranged a crowdfunding project to gain momentum to advance the idea. In my opinion the project is viable, novel and would contribute massively to make London a greener, safer city for cyclists, motorists and the general public. If we are serious about the environment we must get busy on pedal power.

Networking and horizontal collaboration

Enterprises are increasingly finding that innovation springs from collaboration, often from networks that they don’t “own”, i.e. through partnership with external agents, customers, even competitors in some circumstances. In this context I am delighted to have been personally invited to the Open For Business global network, the brainchild of Ted Coiné. This global network of speakers, writers and influencers are very much open for business in 2016. Ted explains the concept:

Open For Business in 2016

Open For Business in 2016

I am very lucky to have a place in this network at Keynotes, adding to the global networks I share with Nadine Hack and Virgin.com. At last, the world is your oyster …

New Year Revolutions

  • In common with Professor Charles Handy, I predict that we are about to realise the power of networks, where small networks can join together to create massive changes in the world for good.
  • We are already seeing how small networks can exert big influence in healthcare and the environment. Entrepreneurs can, for the first time, exert major influence with good products and the ability to network them effectively.
  • Consequently we will have to embrace all the diversity that this opportunity presents, beginning to understand our relative unimportance in a complex and wired world.

Improvising into 2016

Improvisation and adaptiveness

My background as a scientist instilled curiosity and the understanding that most of life is a series of experiments. It has been very good for my life as a musician and even better now as a business owner in an age of disruptive change. In a VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) business environment, life in a business requires perpetual change and experimentation to find new focal points. This is a subtle but important difference than a “random walk” which can leads to fad surfing and a lack of consolidation of your value. Improvisation and adaptation have been invaluable skillsets, through one of the deepest recessions for many decades. In the last year or so, some of the results are beginning to show from what I did when there was not much to do in terms of paid activity during those times.

Joining Dots

People tell me that much of my longevity as a business comes down to joining the dots between people, passions and purposes. After winning a prize from Sir Richard Branson for my work on leadership last year, this has flourished, through some deliberation and a bit of luck, into writing for Virgin, gaining an interview with Richard for my new book with Bloomsbury and, more recently running events, which blend business excellence with music in Branson’s Virgin Money Lounges, giving me the good fortune to work alongside Class A rock stars and discover their insights into business, life and the universe. I have also forged a partnership with the awesome Ted Coiné (awesome is not a word that I am drawn to as a sober Brit), but Ted does deserve this tag with his exclusive network Open for Business, which brings together 50 thought leaders around the globe as co-collaborators.

Screen Shot 2015-12-20 at 21.03.04

Restarting the engines

This year has finally been one when a number of businesses have started again to use the services of external people after many years of simply treading water whilst people halted projects or suspended the use of outside people to contain costs. We’ve been fortunate to deliver a range of projects from business reviews, facilitated strategy summits to leadership and innovation conferences for companies as diverse as FujiFilm, MSD, University College London, Bentley and Roche in the UK, Ireland, Italy, Greece, Denmark, Germany and Poland. I was also surprised to receive requests for consultancy projects from The Welsh Assembly, Renault-Nissan and Alstom Transport during the year.

Private joys

I believe that we work best when we do what we love. In my case that means occasionally doing things that my colleagues tell me are dream jobs. Amongst the private joys I’ve had in 2015, I’d mention these:

1. Taking BBC Business correspondent Robert Peston to a P-Funk concert with George Clinton and subsequently writing him a song for his departure from the BBC in support of Cancer Research UK. Check “Pestonomics” out here:

2. Interviewing John Mayall, the Godfather of the Blues, Prince’s sax player, Marcus Anderson and Prince’s first lady, Sheila E, about flow, improvisation, music and a range of other topics. I was delighted to find that Sheila had previously seen my book “Sex, Leadership and Rock’n’Roll” – just an incredible result from delivering a copy of the book to Prince some 8 years ago and proof positive of the value of networking. Check Sheila’s interview out here:

3. Performing on stage at London’s Borderline with Bernie Tormé, Ozzy Osbourne and Ian Gillan’s guitarist. Bernie was extremely kind in crediting me for having contributed to the reinvention of his career alongside Arthur Brown and Ginger Wildheart, a great honour and a privilege for someone who takes no prisoners. Here’s the 3 minute rehearsal of his song “Party’s Over”:

4. A great joy was recording four songs as a tribute to my good friend Bill Nelson, who has inspired the likes of Kate Bush, David Bowie, Brian Eno, Brian May at al. Bill has been a constant source of inspiration and wisdom for over 40 years of my life and remains to this day a permanent flame when the lights go out from time to time. Check out the Be-Bop Deluxe song “Crying to the Sky”, which was itself an homage to Jimi Hendrix. Also one of my earliest musical influences from Bill’s band Be-Bop Deluxe “Adventures in a Yorkshire Landscape”, written about Bill’s home area. Recording these songs was not an idle musical adventure. Through my advert for musicians, the project introduced me to Robert Craven, Virgin author and business speaker, also a Bill Nelson nut. I had already known of Robert through his work at The Director’s Centre but we had not met. To misquote Be-Bop Deluxe, the meeting was “Made In Heaven” and Robert and I are planning some collaborations for 2016.

5. I was fortunate to have played a small part in helping Patti Russo reinvent her career in the PME (Post Meatloaf Era). I enjoyed her performances with Spike Edney and the SAS band immensely but the high point was seeing her perform solo at The Opera House at Buxton where she gave a spine tingling performance of her song “One Door Opens”.

Public disappointments

The VUCA environment of the last few years have seen more window shoppers than usual and turbulence has just more or less cancelled much of my work for 2016, due to a merger at Pfizer-Allergan, an internal reorganisation and a persistent timewaster, who shall go un-named at the moment, since I am presently trying to mediate over the matter. No matter how old I get, I have not yet invented a foolproof way to spot fools in advance of them fooling me into giving my time for free. Hey ho, I guess that the alternative is to develop greater resilience!

My biggest mistake in 2015 was when I was approached by a chap called Mike Waterton, who rolled up in a Bentley seeking advice on how to transform his career from the boss of a recruitment agency into a noted author and speaker. I saw no reason to doubt his credentials (My wife tells me I trust everyone!) A while later, he told me he was unable to pay for the services I had provided as his business had gone into liquidation. Later on, he was accused in a local newspaper of pimping out his 25 year old girlfriend at a hotel in Kent! I generally consider myself to be a good judge of character, but I guess you never can tell … ! The FBI (Foolish Businessman Indicator) would have come in handy! It’s the first bad debt I have had in 21 years of business and I cannot understand how I did not spot the alarm bells earlier. It turns out that Mike is the victim of the seductive argument that you can have everything you want in life, as suggested in the book “The Secret” and beautifully parodied in “Family Guy” when Brian the dog decides to turn himself into a personal development guru and writes a book called “Wish It, Want It, Do It“:

FG

Click on the picture to see an excerpt of this brilliant piece of satire on The Law of Attraction

As a result of becoming indoctrinated by “The Secret” Mike bought the Bentley without realising that he would bankrupt his business in the process. His wife then left him after he acquired a young girl that appeared to come with the car. Lots of other people lost their jobs and earnings as a result of his self-obsessed strategy, informed by one of his mantras – “Think only of Yourself”, which is morally bankrupt and which bankrupted him and others who his life connected with. It’s not what I advised him to do and I’m disappointed that (a) he was economical with the truth about his situation and (b) that I was not able to persuade him to take a different course of action. I’d cautioned him about his strategy, suggesting that he built on his strengths rather than attempting to build a business on someone else’s brand, where he had no authority platform to operate from. Unfortunately, my advice turned out to be correct, but he also took advice from his girlfriend, who encouraged him to reach for the stars. A clear case of what my Mancunian wife calls “Fur Coat, No Knickers”.

Clearly I had little to offer in terms of professional coaching when matched against sex ... one of life's professional disappointments

Clearly I had little to offer in terms of professional coaching when matched against sex … one of life’s professional disappointments

Hopes and fears

“I made it through the wilderness, yeah I made it through” – Madonna

Having come through the recession over 8 years, I come out of it having refined what I do, branded it, become much better networked and with a range of artefacts to show for my efforts, the most precious one of which is a major new book called “Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise” for Bloomsbury which I’m very excited about.

Of course, I am 8 years older into the bargain and this occasionally worries me as young things can see such people as irrelevant in a workplace that values apps over application and wisdom. To survive in business in an adaptive environment requires improvisation, curiosity and the willingness to learn new skills without becoming distracted by every shiny new thing that passes you by. As an improvising musician scientist and business owner I feel up for the challenge …

Wishing you a happy and prosperous 2016.

Peter

 

Charity begins at The Bank of England …

I have just written, arranged and recorded some songs on “economics futures” for our 2015 Charity campaign with Dr Andrew Sentance, former MPC member at The Bank of England, Haydn Jones, Managing Director at Fujitsu, alongside a band of musicians featuring Rick Benbow, a session musician and member of Brit Floyd, who recently scored Status Quo’s “Aquostic” album. The triple A side EP “Rockonomics” was engineered by Ozzy Osbourne and Ian Gillan’s former guitarist Bernie Tormé.

The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street is ravished

The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street is ravished

The songs tell tales of eMen’eM (Macro-economic Mayhem (Yes, I know there are not so many hits written about such things!!):

New Normal” predicts a flatter economic forecast and was a term coined by Andrew Sentance in his first book. The song is set in a Neil Young / R.E.M inspired rebel rant.

The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street” (formerly “Forward Guidance” after Governor of The Bank of England, Mark Carney’s catchphrase) is a Blackmore’s Night and Led Zeppelinesque inspired 16th century folk rock anthem that calls bankers, brokers and bosses to rethink the fundamentals on which capitalism rests.

Plus the bonus track “Fiscal Cliff” which I wrote for a BBC programme. Almost as soon as I’d finished it, the BBC were instructed by the Government to stop talking the economy down, so I lost my money and it never made the programme.  That’s the media for you! 😦

We are selling the songs with the option to donate a significant amount to a basket of charities. We are also available for live performances supported by keynote talks in the Square Mile or indeed anywhere around the world. Click the picture to donate by buying the songs plus a bonus track now:

Our Charities

By far the best option for purchase is Bandcamp, as the vast majority of the money reaches the chosen charities with Bandcamp only taking a modest commission. Buy the triple A side EP at TRIPLE A SIDE. Or individual tracks via SINGLES.  The songs will be available on iTunes / Amazon etc. shortly if you just want the tracks without a charitable donation. Meet the band:

Dr Andrew Sentance – Acoustic Guitar, Backing Vocals, Economics
Zee Fincham – Lead Vocals
Rick Benbow – Keyboards
Pete Stephens – Drums, percussion
Haydn Jones – Bass guitar, vocals
Peter Cook – Lead guitars, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar, musical direction

Rock in the City

Rock in the City L-R : Moi, Haydn Jones, Pete Stephens, Zee Fincham, Rick Benbow and Dr Andrew Sentance

The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street - inspired by Stairway to Heaven - Robert Plant looks amused - Photography by my friend Christina Jansen

The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street – inspired by Stairway to Heaven – Robert Plant looks bemused – Photograph by my good friend, the lovely Christina Jansen http://www.cjansenphotography.com

Here’s the video for the bonus track: “Fiscal Cliff” – a hard rock song for hard times – the forerunner to the Rock In The City sessions:

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For fresh thinking on Business grab copies of our books on Amazon, including new editions of “The Music of Business” and a 2nd edition of “Punk Rock People Management” – disruptive strategy and common sense ideas about leading your people.

Pre-order our new book for Bloomsbury at Leading Innovation, Creativity and Enterprise.  Groundbreaking thought leadership on leading and managing Brain Based Enterprises where thinking and doing are aligned in perfect harmony.