Networking in the Dragons Den

I’d previously commented on the role of planned luck in making business networking work, following my recent visit to Greece.  Yet another few pieces of planned spontaneity came together the other day.

I’d been asked to make a film for the Open University Business School as an advocate of their MBA programme.   To make the most of their time and film crew, I devised a “3 for 1 offer”, by bringing along some great fellow MBA colleagues: Phil Hawthorn and Kim Tasso, a strategy/business development consultant and writer on management/marketing in the professions.  Here’s the film The Open University made, shot outside Dingwalls, the famous London Rock venue:

p.s. Video made by Louise Hill-Hottinger of Chalk Square Media– superb work with no fuss.

This led to an invite to the inaugural professorial lecture by Evan Davis, Presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Today, The Bottom Line and BBC One’s Dragons Den.  I had been keen to give Evan copies of ‘Sex, Leadership and Rock’n’Roll’ and ‘Punk Rock People Management’ and had wondered how to do that in an evening where there were more than 200 people present and there would be no time for detailed conversation.

The answer arrived quite by chance.  I got off the train at Milton Keynes to find Mr Davis on the platform, looking for the stairs.  “Are you going to the Open University Evan?” I asked.  His 1st impression was that he was being approached by a busker (I had a Sex Pistols T-Shirt and a guitar about my person, so it was not an unreasonable assumption! :-) Once he realised I was an MBA tutor and not a stalker, he invited me to share a taxi to the University, giving me a unique opportunity to help him prepare for the audience he faced that evening and also to share the books.  He kindly agreed to have a read in between everything else he does and I was delighted to have met him on a 1:1 basis rather than in the hustle and bustle of a busy event.  To hear Evan Davis’ inaugural lecture click on the links – LECTURE and Q&A.  Here’s a picture of us at the lecture later on.

Rock'n'Roll Economics - at the Professorial Lecture

If you would also like to read Punk Rock People Management please contact me via the link for a FREE copy.   The book recently overtook Dave Ulrich, Gary Hamel and the usual HR Gurus, having hit No 1 on Amazon Kindle in management and HR books.

Speaking of Dragons Den – I leave you with this mashup by the BBC on Steve Jobs:

Rock’n’Roll innovators – Steve Jobs 1955 – 2011

It’s pretty much all been said, but we lost one of our greatest old school innovators this week as Steve Jobs fell prey to cancer.  This resonated especially with me as my brother also succumbed to this most resilient of diseases this year.  In spite of huge leaps forward cures for cancer still elude medical and pharmaceutical innovation.  Having come from the world of scientific innovation myself, I believe that even cancer will be history by the end of the 21st century.  Lou Reed sums up the rollercoaster of emotions that cancer represents in his album ‘Magic and Loss’, which examines the demise of personal friends to the disease:

I was talking to Richard Bandler last night and the conversation reminded me of how Steve Jobs describes death as life’s ultimate change agent, in terms of its ability to make way for the new.  Check his Stanford University talk of 2005 on this point, shortly after he contracted the disease.  It is a breathtaking speech:

Steve Jobs was a remarkable man, so I pondered what he leaves us as a lasting legacy:

Jobs was no friend of market research, preferring intuition as a spur to innovation.  It’s a characteristic he shares with Leo Fender, who was not a great guitar player, but designed intuitively great features into his groundbreaking Fender Stratocaster guitar.  I’ll be telling the Fender Strat story in a future post.  For now, here’s my dead Fender Strat, after its premature cremation by IBM leaders at a business conference some years back.

IBM burnt my guitar

Jobs’ 2nd legacy was his insistence that technology needed to fuse style and substance.  This was modelled down to the last detail in Apple’s products, which made Apple products design icons as well as functionally superior.  People’s love of the Apple brand and design is evident in their personal tributes this week at Apple stores all over the world.  I believe this arises not just out of style for its own sake, but because Jobs fused style with substance.

Jobs’ third legacy is his mantra “stay hungry, stay foolish”.  Comfort does not make for great innovation, nor does taking yourself too seriously.  All too often hunger and playfulness are driven out of corporate life with disastrous consequences for long term innovation.  To read more on the HR issues surrounding innovation check out ‘What’s New Pussycat?”  The credit crunch and the recession have exacerbated blame cultures and disputes over pay.   Steve Jobs’ last reported yearly salary was $1.  Check Dean Becker’s blog out for an excellent personal analysis of the qualities that made Steve Jobs an agile and adaptive learner.

It seems fitting to end this post with a personal consequence of Jobs’ approach to innovation.  Here’s a piece of music I wrote and recorded on my beloved iMac entitled “Mars Warming” from the album “Music from the Basement of Cognition“.  This music was conceived as a coda to an epic film and is filled with joy, sadness and melancholy.  It simply would have not been possible to have recorded this piece of music without Steve Jobs.  May he rest in peace.